Monday, January 10, 2011

Who has the Momentum?

Momentum summary. Use this as a supplement to your textbooks.

Momentum

The sports announcer says, "Going into the all-star break, the Chicago White Sox have the momentum." The headlines declare "Chicago Bulls Gaining Momentum." The coach pumps up his team at half-time, saying "You have the momentum; the critical need is that you use that momentum and bury them in this third quarter."

Momentum is a commonly used term in sports. A team that has the momentum is on the move and is going to take some effort to stop. A team that has a lot of momentum is really on the move and is going to be hard to stop. Momentum is a physics term; it refers to the quantity of motion that an object has. A sports team that is on the move has the momentum. If an object is in motion (on the move) then it has momentum.

Momentum can be defined as "mass in motion." All objects have mass; so if an object is moving, then it has momentum - it has its mass in motion. The amount of momentum that an object has is dependent upon two variables: how much stuff is moving and how fast the stuff is moving. Momentum depends upon the variables mass and velocity. In terms of an equation, the momentum of an object is equal to the mass of the object times the velocity of the object.

Momentum = mass • velocity

In physics, the symbol for the quantity momentum is the lower case "p". Thus, the above equation can be rewritten as

p = m • v

where m is the mass and v is the velocity. The equation illustrates that momentum is directly proportional to an object's mass and directly proportional to the object's velocity.

The units for momentum would be mass units times velocity units. The standard metric unit of momentum is the kg•m/s. While the kg•m/s is the standard metric unit of momentum, there are a variety of other units that are acceptable (though not conventional) units of momentum. Examples include kg•mi/hr, kg•km/hr, and g•cm/s. In each of these examples, a mass unit is multiplied by a velocity unit to provide a momentum unit. This is consistent with the equation for momentum.

Momentum is a vector quantity. As discussed in an earlier unit, a vector quantity is a quantity that is fully described by both magnitude and direction. To fully describe the momentum of a 5-kg bowling ball moving westward at 2 m/s, you must include information about both the magnitude and the direction of the bowling ball. It is not enough to say that the ball has 10 kg•m/s of momentum; the momentum of the ball is not fully described until information about its direction is given. The direction of the momentum vector is the same as the direction of the velocity of the ball. In a previous unit, it was said that the direction of the velocity vector is the same as the direction that an object is moving. If the bowling ball is moving westward, then its momentum can be fully described by saying that it is 10 kg•m/s, westward. As a vector quantity, the momentum of an object is fully described by both magnitude and direction.

From the definition of momentum, it becomes obvious that an object has a large momentum if either its mass or its velocity is large. Both variables are of equal importance in determining the momentum of an object. Consider a Mack truck and a roller skate moving down the street at the same speed. The considerably greater mass of the Mack truck gives it a considerably greater momentum. Yet if the Mack truck were at rest, then the momentum of the least massive roller skate would be the greatest. The momentum of any object that is at rest is 0. Objects at rest do not have momentum - they do not have any "mass in motion." Both variables - mass and velocity - are important in comparing the momentum of two objects.

The momentum equation can help us to think about how a change in one of the two variables might affect the momentum of an object. Consider a 0.5-kg physics cart loaded with one 0.5-kg brick and moving with a speed of 2.0 m/s. The total mass of loaded cart is 1.0 kg and its momentum is 2.0 kg•m/s. If the cart was instead loaded with three 0.5-kg bricks, then the total mass of the loaded cart would be 2.0 kg and its momentum would be 4.0 kg•m/s. A doubling of the mass results in a doubling of the momentum.

Similarly, if the 2.0-kg cart had a velocity of 8.0 m/s (instead of 2.0 m/s), then the cart would have a momentum of 16.0 kg•m/s (instead of 4.0 kg•m/s). A quadrupling in velocity results in a quadrupling of the momentum. These two examples illustrate how the equation p = m•v serves as a "guide to thinking" and not merely a "plug-and-chug recipe for algebraic problem-solving."

1996-2011 The Physics Classroom

Do not Hesitate to use The Physics Classroom their help is greatly appreciated
and they provide great reviews and different perspectives to help you better understand the principles and calculations in Physical Science.



More examples to come... Does this help?



This is a GREAT SITE for practicing Momentum calculation problems..

Did I say that loud enough...

This is a Great Site !!!!

an excerpt :

Steps for Solving Momentum Problems

As in the procedure for solving other force problems, calculating momentum is a step by step process. We will use a problem to work through the steps.


Problem: Calculate the momentum of a 11.35kg wagon rolling down a hill at 12m/s.
Step 1 : Write down the equation needed for solving momentum.
p = mv

Step 2: Insert all known measurements into the formula.

p = (11.35kg) (12m/s)


Step 3: Solve. Carefully enter all numerical values into your calculator.

p = 136.2 kg x m/s down the hill

  • Check your work and make sure that all numbers have a SI unit label and that you have the correct SI unit for momentum.
  • Don't forget the direction in your answer label! The velocity is down the hill, so the momentum will be the same.
  • It is a good idea to always double check your answers because it is very easy to hit the wrong button on your calculator!

Go get some momentum formula experience! Do the practice problems.


Help solving one step formula problems click here


Practice Momentum Problems at the bottom of the page.

66 comments:

  1. Answers p. 356

    1. Golf ball: 0.045 kg x 16 m/s = 0.72 kg∙m/s

    Baseball: 0.14 kg x 7 m/s = 0.98 kg∙m/s

    The baseball has greater momentum

    2. 0.27 kg∙m/s Bird’s momentum

    (0.018 kg x 15 m/s = 0.27 kg∙m/s)


    Answers p. 359

    Reviewing Key Concepts

    1. a. If one object exerts a force on another object, the second object exerts an equal and opposite force on the first object.

    b. Action and reaction forces are equal in strength and opposite in direction.

    c. When you caught the ball, you (with the ball in your hand) would move in the direction of the ball’s initial motion.

    2. a. Momentum is a characteristic of a moving object equal to the product of its mass and its velocity.

    b. Because the velocity of a parked car is zero, its momentum is zero.

    c. Cars traveling at faster speeds have more momentum and are more difficult to stop than cars traveling at slower speeds.

    3. a. Disregarding friction, the quantity of momentum is the same before and after objects interact.

    b. The total momentum stays the same: 0.06 kg m/s

    ReplyDelete
  2. Bill Nye's video was a great explanation for me. Putting momentum into bowling was intresting. I saw that the ping pong ball wasn't enough momentum, but Bill was. Overall this was a great video to learn about momentum.

    I was also wondering if me and my partner could sign up for the presentations tommrow? Thanks and sorry for the inconvience.

    Thanks,
    Megan Blue

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hey Megan, I am so glad you enjoyed the Video.

    Do you mean you want to present tomorrow, or you want to sign up tomorrow?


    No inconvenience either way.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Sign up, Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  5. P=MV
    1) Ball: 0.15kg x 40m/s.. momentum = 6kg x m/s toward home plate.

    2) hokey puck 1: 2kg x 2.5m/s.. momentum =
    5kg x m/s east.

    hokey puck 2: 1.3kg x 3m/s.. momentum =
    3.9kg x m/s south (hokey puck number 1 has greater momentum).

    3) discus: 2kg x 21m/s.. momentum = 42kg x m/s down field.

    4) Ball: 700g x 4.6m/s.. momentum = 3220g x m/s down ramp.

    5) Shell: 40.5kg x 120m/s.. momentum =
    4860kg x m/s toward target.

    Jeremy,yellow

    ReplyDelete
  6. Mr. V,I was a little confused and momentum but I watched the Bill Nye video and now it is a lot more clear. The comparison between the ping pong ball and the bowling ball made me realize that anything can have momentum. Thanks :)

    Casey/Yellow

    ReplyDelete
  7. I am glad the videos helped.

    put two (2) in the bonus box.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Jeremy, don't worry, you will get your bonus points. I just haven't actually worked all the problems yet to check the answers....my bad!

    ReplyDelete
  9. The video was a good visual for understanding momentum!But I was also wondering accidentally did extra work(pg 365 key concept 1-2 rockets and satellites)And I didn't know do you get bonus points for doing extra work?If not it was still cool to learn why satellites stay space!

    Mackenzie/Green

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hey Mr. V the Bill Nye video was very helpful thank you.
    Larry/yellow

    ReplyDelete
  11. 1. P=MV
    M=.15kg and V=40m/s
    P=.15kg(40m/s)
    The momentum is 6kg x m/s towards home plate.
    2. P=MV
    M=2kg and V=2.5m/s
    P=2kg(2.5m/s)
    The momentum is 5kg x m/s east
    P=MV
    M=1.3kg and V=3m/s
    P=1.3kg(3m/s)
    The momentum is 3.9kg x m/s south
    The first hockey puck had a greater momentum
    3. P=MV
    M=2kg and V=21m/s
    P=2kg(21m/s)
    The momentum is 42kg x m/s down the field
    4. P=MV
    M=700g and V=4.6m/s
    P=700g(4.6m/s)
    The momentum is 3220g x m/s down the ramp
    5. P= MV
    M=40.5kg and V=120m/s
    P=40.5kg(120m/s)
    The momentum is 4860kg x m/s toward target

    Larry/yellow

    ReplyDelete
  12. Of course you get bonus for doing extra work... silly gooses

    ReplyDelete
  13. Jeremy, looks like 15 points to me....
    Always always Always always Always always Always always Always always Always always Always always Always always write the question...


    Otherwise, I have to go and match up the answer with the question...

    ReplyDelete
  14. MrV i was really confused about the section assesment quetion with the ball but then i saw you posted them and i figured out how you got the answer! Thanks
    mikaela blue

    ReplyDelete
  15. also even though i already know them why do we need to memorize the first18 elements of the periodic table?

    mikaela/blue

    ReplyDelete
  16. MrV i cant find the bonus momentum questions! HELP please
    mikaela/blue

    ReplyDelete
  17. Mr. Voskuil I found a website that you might like. I found the website while trying to find extra sources to back up my homework answers. take a look at it and tell me if you can use the site thanks... http://www.studyphysics.ca/newnotes/20/unit01_kinematicsdynamics/chp05_forces/lesson17.htm

    Jeremy, yellow

    ReplyDelete
  18. Mr. v, I was right. A fruit is a protective encasing with seeds on the inside. Peanuts are fruit, strawberrys are not. Cucumbers are, as well as tomatoes. I do know what a fruit is.

    Savanah Yellow

    ReplyDelete
  19. 1. Question- Calculate the momentum of a 0.15 kg ball that is moving toward home plate at a velocity of 40m/s.
    Answer- P=MV
    Ball: 0.15kg x 40m/s
    Therefore the momentum of the ball towards home plate is 6kg x m/s.


    2. Question- Which has greater momentum, a 2.0kg hockey puck moving east at 2.5m/s or a 1.3kg hockey puck moving south at 3.0m/s?
    Answer- P=MV
    First hockey puck: 2kg x 2.5m/s
    Therefore the momentum is 5kg x m/s east.
    Second hockey puck: 1.3kg x 3m/s
    Therefore the momentum is 3.9kg x m/s south.
    Obviously the one with the more momentum is the first hockey puck.

    3. Question- A track athlete throws a 2kg discus into a field with a velocity of 21m/s. What is the momentum of the discus?
    Answer- P=MV
    discus: 2kg x 21m/s
    Therefore the momentum would equal 42kg x m/s down field.

    4. Question- Calculate the momentum of a 700g ball that is rolling down a ramp at 4.6m/s.
    Answer- P=MV
    Ball: 700g x 4.6m/s
    Therefore the momentum of the ball rolling down the ramp is 3220g x m/s.

    5. Question- A cannon fires a 40.5kg shell toward a target and the shell moves with a velocity of 120m/s. Calculate the shell's momentum.
    Answer- P=MV
    Shell: 40.5kg x 120m/s
    Therefore the shells momentum is 4860kg x m/s.

    Megan/Blue
    I also have a copy of this in my field notebook... Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  20. found it!!
    1. p=mv
    p=.15kg*40m/s
    p=6kg m/s
    2. p=mv
    HPE p= 2kg*2.5m/s
    p=5kgm/s
    HPS p=13kg*3m/s
    p=3.9kg m/s
    the hockey puck moving east has the greater momentum
    3. p=mv
    p=2kg*21m/s
    p=42kg m/s
    4.p=mv
    p=700g*4m/s
    p=2800g m/s
    mikaela/blue

    ReplyDelete
  21. 1. Calculate the momentum of a 0.15 kg ball that is moving toward home plate at a velocity of 40m/s.
    P=MV
    M=.15kg and V=40m/s
    P=.15kg(40m/s)
    The momentum is 6kg x m/s towards home plate.
    2. Which has greater momentum, a 2.0kg hockey puck moving east at 2.5m/s or a 1.3kg hockey puck moving south at 3.0m/s?
    P=MV
    M=2kg and V=2.5m/s
    P=2kg(2.5m/s)
    The momentum is 5kg x m/s east
    P=MV
    M=1.3kg and V=3m/s
    P=1.3kg(3m/s)
    The momentum is 3.9kg x m/s south
    The first hockey puck had a greater momentum
    3. A track athlete throws a 2kg discus into a field with a velocity of 21m/s. What is the momentum of the discus?
    P=MV
    M=2kg and V=21m/s
    P=2kg(21m/s)
    The momentum is 42kg x m/s down the field
    4. Calculate the momentum of a 700g ball that is rolling down a ramp at 4.6m/s.
    P=MV
    M=700g and V=4.6m/s
    P=700g(4.6m/s)
    The momentum is 3220g x m/s down the ramp
    5. A cannon fires a 40.5kg shell toward a target and the shell moves with a velocity of 120m/s. Calculate the shell's momentum.
    P= MV
    M=40.5kg and V=120m/s
    P=40.5kg(120m/s)
    The momentum is 4860kg x m/s toward target

    Larry/yellow

    ReplyDelete
  22. Mr.V, this question doesn't have anything to do with momentum problems! The extra credit you assigned me to do about the mangroves, "How do mangroves protect the shore from storms and hurricames?" I searched/looked for some answers to the question, but I just couldn't find anything! Can you please help me, or tell me some resources I can use to find the answer(s)?

    Thanks, Period 2 (Orange)

    ReplyDelete
  23. Mr. V, this question doesn't have anything to do with momentum problems. The extra credit you assigned me on "How do mangroves protect the shore from storms and hurricanes?" I can't seem to find some answers for the question! Can you please help me by telling me some resources I can use to find the answer(s)?

    Thanks, Lauren Weedin Period 2

    ReplyDelete
  24. 1.Calculate the momentum of a 0.15 kg ball that is moving toward home plate at a velocity of 40m/s.
    Ball
    Step 1: p = mv
    Step 2: p = (0.15 kg)* (40 m/s)
    Step 3: p = 0.15 kg * 40 m/s
    Step 4: 6 kg x m/s
    2.Which has greater momentum, a 2.0kg hockey puck moving east at 2.5m/s or a 1.3kg hockey puck moving south at 3.0m/s?
    Hockey Puck moving east
    Step 1: p = mv
    Step 2: p = (2.0 kg)* (2.5m/s)
    Step 3: p = 2.0 kg * 2.5 m/s
    Step 4: 5 kg x m/s
    Hockey Puck moving south
    Step 1: p = mv
    Step 2: p = (1.3 kg)* (3.0 m/s)
    Step 3: p = 1.3 kg * 3.0 m/s
    Step 4: 3.9 kg x m/s
    The hockey puck moving west has the greater momentum.

    3.A track athlete throws a 2kg discus into a field with a velocity of 21m/s. What is the momentum of the discus?
    Discus
    Step 1: p = mv
    Step 2: p = (2 kg)* (21 m/s)
    Step 3: p = 2 kg * 21 m/s
    Step 4: 42 kg x m/s

    4.Calculate the momentum of a 700g ball that is rolling down a ramp at 4.6m/s.
    Ball
    Step 1: p = mv
    Step 2: p = (700 kg)* (4.6 m/s)
    Step 3: p = 700 kg * 4.6 m/s
    Step 4: 3220 kg x m/s

    5.Cannon fires a 40.5kg shell toward a target and the shell moves with a velocity of 120m/s. Calculate the shell's momentum.
    Shell
    Step 1: p = mv
    Step 2: p = (40.5 kg)* (120 m/s)
    Step 3: p = 40.5 kg * 120 m/s
    Step 4: 4860 kg x m/s

    Allie, Yellow

    ReplyDelete
  25. For the Yellow Class :

    fruit (fro͞ot)

    The ripened ovary of a flowering plant that contains the seeds, sometimes fused with other parts of the plant. Fruits can be dry or fleshy. Berries, nuts, grains, pods, and drupes are fruits. ♦ Fruits that consist of ripened ovaries alone, such as the tomato and pea pod, are called true fruits. ♦ Fruits that consist of ripened ovaries and other parts such as the receptacle or bracts, as in the apple, are called accessory fruits or false fruits. See also aggregate fruit, multiple fruit, simple fruit. See Note at berry.
    Usage To most of us, a fruit is a plant part that is eaten as a dessert or snack because it is sweet, but to a botanist a fruit is a mature ovary of a plant, and as such it may or may not taste sweet. All species of flowering plants produce fruits that contain seeds. A peach, for example, contains a pit that can grow into a new peach tree, while the seeds known as peas can grow into another pea vine. To a botanist, apples, peaches, peppers, tomatoes, pea pods, cucumbers, and winged maple seeds are all fruits. A vegetable is simply part of a plant that is grown primarily for food. Thus, the leaf of spinach, the root of a carrot, the flower of broccoli, and the stalk of celery are all vegetables. In everyday, nonscientific speech we make the distinction between sweet plant parts (fruits) and nonsweet plant parts (vegetables). This is why we speak of peppers and cucumbers and squash—all fruits in the eyes of a botanist—as vegetables.
    The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

    Savanah Yellow

    ReplyDelete
  26. Lauren, you need ot go to the blog on Mangroves..

    http://mrvbeachteach.blogspot.com/2010/03/man-oh-man-oh-mangrove.html

    Man oh Man oh Mangrove. There two click ons at the end. They will help.

    ReplyDelete
  27. First problem: Calculate the momentum of a 0.15 kg ball that is moving toward home plate at a velocity of 40m/s.
    1.P= m x v
    2.P=(0.15kg) (40m/s)
    3.P= 6kg x m/s toward home plate
    That is the ball’s momentum moving towards home plate.

    Second problem: Which has greater momentum, a 2.0kg hockey puck moving east at 2.5m/s or a 1.3kg hockey puck moving south at 3.0m/s?
    First puck: moving east
    1.P= m x v
    2.P= (2.0kg) 2.5m/s)
    3.P= 5kg x m/s going east
    Second puck: moving south
    1.P= m x v
    2.P= (1.3kg) (3.0m/s)
    3.P= 3.9kg x m/s going south
    *The puck heading east has the greater momentum because 5kg is greater than 3.9kg.

    Third problem: A track athlete throws a 2kg discus into a field with a velocity of 21m/s. What is the momentum of the discus?
    1.P= m x v
    2.P= (2kg) (21m/s)
    3.P= 42kg x m/s is the momentum of the discuss being thrown.

    Fourth problem: Calculate the momentum of a 700g ball that is rolling down a ramp at 4.6m/s.
    1.P= m x v
    2.P= (700kg) (4.6 m/s)
    3.P= 3220g x m/s is the momentum of the ball being rolled down a ramp.

    Fifth problem: A cannon fires a 40.5kg shell toward a target and the shell moves with a velocity of 120m/s. Calculate the shell's momentum.
    1.P= m x v
    2.P= (40.5kg) (20m/s)
    3.P= 810kg x m/s is the shells’ momentum

    Erin- Blue

    ReplyDelete
  28. 1) Calculate the momentum of a 0.15 kg ball that is moving toward home plate at a velocity of 40 m per s.
    step 1) p=mv
    step 2) p=(0.15 kg) * (40 m per s)
    step 3) 6kg * m per s
    The ball is traveling 6kg meters per second.
    2) Which has great momentum a 2 kg hockey puck moving east at 2.5 m/s or a 1.3kg hockey puck moving south at 3 m/s???
    step 1) p=mv
    step 2) p=(2 kg) * (2.5 m/s)
    step 3) 5kg * m/s
    The hockey puck was moving west had a greater momentum then the hockey puck moving east.
    3) A track athlete throws a 2kg discuss into a field with a velocity of 21 m/s. What is the momentum of the discuss?
    step 1) p= mv
    step 2) p=(2kg) * (21 m/s)
    step 3) p= 42 kg * m/s
    The momentum of the discuss moving down the field with a velocity at 21 m/s is 42 kg * m/s.
    4)Calculate the momentum of a 700 g ball that is rolling down a ramp at 4.6 m/s.
    step 1) p= mv
    step 2) p= (700 kg) * (4.6 m/s)
    step 3) p= 3220 kg * m/s
    The ball is rolling 3220 kg * m/s down the ramp.
    5) A Cannon fires a 40.5 kg shell toward a target and a shell moves with a velocity of 120 m/s. Calculate the shells momentum...
    step 1) p= mv
    step 2) p= (40.5 kg) * (120 m/s)
    step 3) 4860 kg * m/s
    The shells momentum at which it is traveling is 4860 kg * m/s.

    Mr. V I have a question... And which you would say a random answer. Anyways why would you put such easy problems up and so many bonus points??? Just a question.

    Paul,
    Yellow

    ReplyDelete
  29. Paul, it is only easy because you have learned how. It was hard at first. A lot of you
    stuck with it, not giving up, really trying, and willing to be wrong now and then.

    I want as many of you to use the blog to its fullest advantage as possible.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Mr.v.
    Thanks for the explanation. I think if everyone actually used the website to its full advantage, i bet you everybody's understanding of the topic we are studying, would be a lot clearer.
    Not to be rude but did I get any bonus points for my work?
    PAul,
    Yellow

    ReplyDelete
  31. Mr.V today we only got to have one presentation since we had to finish and grade the quiz. I dont think the group ever finished, so what happens to the people that we going to present, will they just present tommarrow. Then the people on wed. might not be able to present then. So the Wed. people will present on Thurs. then when will the people on Thurs present. I'm presenting on Wed. so will I end up presenting on Thurs. now??
    Allie Yellow

    ReplyDelete
  32. Mr. V how do I print out the pamphlet to where it all goes on one page?

    Larry
    Yellow

    ReplyDelete
  33. Larry there is a menu in MS Word that lets you write in three columns ... or you can create three text boxes on a page in PowerPoint.. it woks out pretty much the same way.

    Good Q

    ReplyDelete
  34. Sorry Paul ooops, 5x4= 20 your Q and A were written quite precisely.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Allie we will be a bit tighter on time frame. I hope every one has their materials ready.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Hey mr.voskuil ummm I was out at one point should I attach to my progress log the work cuz I have most graded except one? N thank you for the definition from Savannah of what a fruit is! Hahaha :)

    Thank you,
    Sabrina/yellow

    ReplyDelete
  37. Quick Question, Do Fix the Oops sheets need to be signed? Please answer ASAP.
    -Justin, Red/Blue

    ReplyDelete
  38. Sabrina, just attach to progress log. Be sure it has title that matches the assignment's title so I know what you want assessed.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Mr. v,
    I was wondering why I didnt get any bonus points for the momentum questions i answered yesterday? If you would like me to print out a hard copy or written copy even, for tomorrow, i would be glad to do so.
    Thanks!
    Erin ~ Blue

    ReplyDelete
  40. Bonus Momentum Problems

    1.)Calculate the momentum of a 0.15 kg ball that is moving toward home plate at a velocity of 40m/s.

    1: p = mv
    2: p = (0.15 kg)* (40 m/s)
    3: p = 0.15 kg * 40 m/s
    4: 6 kg x m/s

    2.)Which has greater momentum, a 2.0kg hockey puck moving east at 2.5m/s or a 1.3kg hockey puck moving south at 3.0m/s?
    Hockey Puck moving east

    1: p = mv
    2: p = (2.0 kg)* (2.5m/s)
    3: p = 2.0 kg * 2.5 m/s
    4: 5 kg x m/s
    Hockey Puck moving south

    1: p = mv
    2: p = (1.3 kg)* (3.0 m/s)
    3: p = 1.3 kg * 3.0 m/s
    4: 3.9 kg x m/s

    The westward hockey puck has the greater momentum.

    3.)A track athlete throws a 2kg discus into a field with a velocity of 21m/s. What is the momentum of the discus?

    1: p = mv
    2: p = (2 kg)* (21 m/s)
    3: p = 2 kg * 21 m/s
    4: 42 kg x m/s

    4.)Calculate the momentum of a 700g ball that is rolling down a ramp at 4.6m/s.

    1: p = mv
    2: p = (700 kg)* (4.6 m/s)
    3: p = 700 kg * 4.6 m/s
    4: 3220 kg x m/s

    5.)Cannon fires a 40.5kg shell toward a target and the shell moves with a velocity of 120m/s. Calculate the shell's momentum.

    1: p = mv
    2: p = (40.5 kg)* (120 m/s)
    3: p = 40.5 kg * 120 m/s
    4: 4860 kg x m/s

    -Savanah Yellow

    ReplyDelete
  41. ERIN ... "that's my bad!" Sorry I missed your posting. Thanks you for checking on it. Do me a favor, put a note in the turn-in folder tomorrow reminding me!

    that would be 5 problems x 4 bonus points each = 20 problem bonus points.

    Again, big OOOPS, sorry.

    ReplyDelete
  42. So Savanah, you want your bonus points too I suppose?

    ReplyDelete
  43. Oh its perfectly fine!
    thank you so much!
    Erin~ Blue

    ReplyDelete
  44. Mr. V,
    is there any other way to recieve, more bonus points by doing ANYTHING else?
    Erin /Blue

    ReplyDelete
  45. Hmmm ? Erin there will be bonus opportunity tomorrow.. be sure you pick up the Bonus Opportunity worksheet. AND check the Blog tomorrow.

    ReplyDelete
  46. is there any extra credit for marine?

    brooke/red

    ReplyDelete
  47. Perfect! Thx
    erin

    ReplyDelete
  48. 1. Calculate the momentum of a 0.15kg ball that is moving toward home plate at a velocity of 40m/s.

    Momentum (p)= MxV
    Momentum= 0.15x40m/s
    6kg x m/s= 0.15x40m/s
    The momentum is 6kg x m/s.

    2. Which has a greater momentum, a 2.0 kg hockey puck moving east at 2.5m/s or a 1.3 kg hockey puck moving south at 30m/s?

    Hockey Puck Moving East:
    P= MxV
    P= 2.0 x 2.5
    P= 5kg x m/s

    Hockey Puck Moving South:
    P= MxV
    P= 1.3 x 3.0
    P= 3.9kg x m/s
    Hockey Puck heading east has the greater momentum.

    3. A track athlete throws a 2kg discus into a field with a velocity of 21m/s. What is the momentum of the discus?

    P= MxV
    P= 2 x 21
    P= 42kg x m/s
    The momentum of the discus is 42 kg x m/s

    4. Calculate the momentum of a 700g ball that is rolling down a ramp at 4.6m/s.

    P= MxV
    P= 700 x 4.6
    P= 3220kg x m/s
    The momentum of the ball is 3220kg x m/s.

    5. A cannon fires a 40.5kg shell toward a target and the shell moves with a velocity of 120m/s. Calculate the shell's momentum.

    P= MxV
    P= 40.5 x 120
    P= 4860kg x m/s
    The momentum of the shell is 4860kg x m/s


    Tyler/Green

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  49. is there any extra credit besides the momentum problems for physical science?


    Tyler/Green

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  50. There is the one handout for Bonus from class,

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  51. are we switching out of marine tomorrow?
    kali/violet

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  52. Hey Mr. Voskiul,
    I have a question. Last thursday I was suppose to present my element and I dressed up to do my presentation so I could get extra points. But it ended up that I could not present that day since you were not there. So today I dressed up again, thinking you might be there so I could present but again i couldnt. My main question here is do I need to dress up again for when I present? Cause I already have twice now. and when will I be presenting? And oh by the way I heard you are sick?, If you are I hope you feel better!
    -Hannah/yellow

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  53. Hannah, You are first on Wednesday.. I wil be there (I hope)

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  54. Mr.v for my second poster im doing for the element when does it have to be turned in... can i turn it in on wensday. charles, green

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  55. Bonus Posters are due on Friday.

    Good Q Charles !!!!

    ReplyDelete
  56. Can i turn it in tommarow with my other poster. Charles, green

    ReplyDelete
  57. 1.)
    Calculate the momentum of a 2.7Kg brick launched from a giant slingshot at 50m/s.
    1: p= mv
    2: p= (2.7kg)(50m/s)
    3: p= 207kg x 50m/s
    4 : p= 135kg x m/s
    Ans: The momentum of the brick that was launched was 135kg x m/s.

    2.)
    Which has a greater momentum, a 31.5kg arrow moving at a target at 66m/s or a 3.6 bullet moving at 896m/s?

    Arrow:
    1: p= mv
    2: p= (31.5kg)(66m/s)
    3: p= 2'079kg x m/s
    Bullet:
    1: p= mv
    2: p= (3.6mg)(869m/s)
    3: p= 3'128.4mg x m/s
    ans: The bullet has the greater momentum at 3'128.4kg x m/s.

    3.)
    Calculate the momentum of a 0.43 kg football being thrown by a quarterback at 25m/s
    Football:
    1: p= mv
    2: p= (0.43)(25m/s)
    3: p= 10.75kg x m/s
    Ans: the momentum football was thrown at 10.75kg x m/s by the quarterback by .

    4.)
    Calculate the momentum of a 1.5kg basketball, shot in the basket at 4.4m/s by basketball player.
    1: p= mv
    2: p= (1.5kg)(4.5m/s)
    3: p= 20.25kg x m/s
    Ans: the momentum of the ball is 20.25kg x m/s from the basketball player.

    Bernhard: yellow

    ReplyDelete
  58. Well done sir, It is a bit late but still now you know how to do Momentum problems...


    So... this time

    put 20 in the bonus box and label the reason...

    4 Problems on the blog.

    Way to go!

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